Flooring Types

Olson Contract Floors Types of Flooring

Laminate Flooring

Laminate flooring (also called floating wood tile in the United States) is a multi-layer synthetic flooring product fused together with a lamination process.

Laminate Flooring

Laminate flooring (also called floating wood tile in the United States) is a multi-layer synthetic flooring product fused together with a lamination process. Laminate flooring simulates wood (or sometimes stone) with a photographic applique layer under a clear protective layer. The inner core layer is usually composed of melamine resin and fiber board materials.

Laminate flooring has grown significantly in popularity, perhaps because it may be easier to install and maintain than more traditional surfaces such as hardwood flooring. It may also have the advantages of costing less and requiring less skill to install than alternative flooring materials. It is reasonably durable, hygienic (several brands contain an antimicrobial resin), and relatively easy to maintain.

What is Resilient Flooring?

Resilient flooring, also called vinyl flooring, is a flooring created from carefully selected natural and synthetic materials. Today’s resilient flooring is a highly engineered combination of polymer materials.

Polymers are large molecules composed of repeating structural units, which allow for increased strength and durability for the lifetime of the product. This product construction has changed over the years; just as products in other industries have incorporated new and better technology, resilient flooring has as well.

Resilient Flooring

Resilient flooring, also called vinyl flooring, is a flooring created from carefully selected natural and synthetic materials.

Ceramic & Porcelain

Call Olson Contract Floors to discuss your next Ceramic Tile Project today!

Ceramic & Porcelain

Olson Contract Floors specializes in Ceramic, Porcelain, and Stone Tiles!

Ceramic, porcelain or stone tile

Tile terminology can be confusing. Most types of tiles that are made from clay or a mixture of clay and other materials, then kiln-fired, are considered to be a part of the larger classification called “Ceramic Tiles.” These tiles can be split into two groups: porcelain tiles and non-porcelain tiles. These non-porcelain tiles are frequently referred to as ceramic tiles by themselves, separate from porcelain tiles.
Ceramic” or non-porcelain tiles are generally made from red or white clay fired in a kiln. They are almost always finished with a durable glaze which carries the color and pattern. These tiles are used in both wall tile and floor tile applications, are softer and easier to cut than porcelain, and usually carry a PEI 0 to 3 rating. Non-porcelain ceramic tiles are usually suitable for very light to moderate traffic and generally have a relatively high water absorption rating, making them less frost resistant and more prone to wear and chipping than porcelain tiles.

Porcelain tile is a tile that is generally made by the dust pressed method from porcelain clays, resulting in a tile that is dense, impervious, fine grained and smooth with a sharply formed face. Porcelain tiles usually have a much lower water absorption rate (less than 0.5%) than non-porcelain tiles, making them frost resistant or frost-proof. Glazed porcelain tiles are much harder and more damage resistant than non-porcelain ceramic tiles, making them suitable for any application from light traffic to the heaviest residential and light commercial traffic. Full body porcelain tiles carry the color and pattern through the entire thickness of the tile, making them virtually impervious to wear, and are suitable for any application from residential to high-traffic commercial or industrial applications. Porcelain tiles are available in matte, unglazed or a high polished finish.

Hard Wood Flooring

Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity.

However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor. It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, and Europe which are several hundred years old to have the original solid wood floor still in use today.

Hard Wood Flooring

Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber.

Carpets

Olson Contract Floors specializes in custom carpet designs!

Carpet Flooring

A carpet is a textile floor covering consisting of an upper layer of “pile” attached to a backing. The pile is generally either made from wool or a man-made fiber such as polypropylene, nylon or polyester and usually consists of twisted tufts which are often heat-treated to maintain their structure.